Ok, let’s start off with the basics:

Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder where nerve cells that make dopamine are destroyed. Dopamine is an important neurotransmitter and without it, nerve cells are unable to properly send messages to other parts of the body. Eventually, the destruction of dopamine-producing cells leads to a loss of muscle function that gets worse over time. The typical symptoms of Parkinson’s are shaking and difficulty with walking, movement, and muscle coordination.  Unfortunately, not a lot is known about why these nerve cells waste away in the first place.

In gene therapy, a gene variant is used to alter the function of a cell or an organ. The way that genes are transferred into cells is pretty interesting: the gene is put into an inert virus, which is then injected into the target cell to deliver the gene.

Now, a new large-scale study suggests that a type of gene therapy (called NLX-P101) may be able to improve Parkinson’s symptoms. The gene that was targeted is called GAD (stands for glutamic acid decarboxylase). This gene produces a chemical called GABA (stands for Gamma-aminobutyric acid), which is a neurotransmitter than inhibits the excessive firing of neurons seen among Parkinson’s patients. From an interview in ScienceDaily with one of the researchers, Dr. Matthew During:

“In Parkinson’s disease, not only do patients lose many dopamine-producing brain cells, but they also develop substantial reductions in the activity and amount of GABA in their brains. This causes a dysfunction in brain circuitry responsible for coordinating movement,” explains Dr. During.

So, what they’ve done is inject a fully-functioning GAD gene into the brains of Parkinson’s patients. Those that were injected showed substantial improvement compared to individuals that did not receive the treatment.  

References

LeWitt, P.A. et al. (2011). AAV2-GAD gene therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease: a double-blind, sham-surgery controlled, randomised trial. Lancet Neurology in press.